DISTRICT 7 CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS

DEMOCRAT

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Governor's Council approves or rejects potential state court judges.

As an attorney and a former special education teacher who's worked with children caught up in the courts, I know that judges matter.

COMPASSION

in our Juvenile Courts

As an attorney and former special education teacher who’s worked with at-risk teens, I’ve seen that it’s kids who've experienced significant childhood trauma and/or have bounced around our foster system who are most likely to be referred to the courts. Once there: consequences for typical teenage behavior become part of their record; their education is interrupted; they are more likely to land in cycles of incarceration as adults. We need child development and mental health experts within our juvenile courts striving to create opportunity rather than incarceration for our most vulnerable kids.

CIVILITY

People over partisanship

Democracy is about working together to reach consensus: choosing judges with the right temperament, experience, and expertise is a non-partisan task. We can’t let the theatrics of Washington’s judicial appointment process infect Massachusetts.

Civility also means securing individual liberties and protecting everyone in our inclusive, diverse Commonwealth. Regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, or social status, all deserve equity under the law. And our courts should continue to affirm that some decisions- whom to love, how and when to start a family- should be left to individuals.

COMMON SENSE

in our justice system

Public safety starts with keeping violent criminals out of our communities, period. Thankfully, recidivism rates (prisoners who reoffend shortly after release) are dropping. To continue this trend, we must address the mental health and addiction issues overwhelming our schools, courts, and prisons. We risk public safety, damage families, and create challenges for law enforcement and corrections officers when we release prisoners worse off than when they entered the system.

Let's better utilize life- and money-saving diversion and treatment programs when appropriate. This reduces crime and saves taxpayer dollars (we spend close to $60,000 per year to lock someone up). 

District 7 Central MA

About Governor's Council

Governor's Council consists of 8 Councilors and the Lieutenant Governor, who serves ex officio.  The Council’s work includes approving or rejecting the Governor’s judicial, parole board, and industrial accident board nominees. Each Councilor is elected from a district comprised of 5 state senate districts. District 7 contains 65 communities in Central Massachusetts. Councillors serve 2-year terms; Paul will be on the ballot in the September state primary and hopefully the November 2020 general election.

Ashburnham

Ashby

Athol

Auburn

Barre

Bellingham

Berlin

Blackstone

Bolton

Boylston

Brimfield

Brookfield

Charlton

Clinton

Douglas

Dudley

East Brookfield

Fitchburg

Gardner

Grafton

Hardwick

Holden

Holland

Hopedale

Hubbardston

Lancaster

Leicester

Leominster

Lunenburg

Mendon

Milford

Millbury

Millville

Monson

New Braintree

North Brookfield

Northborough - Pcts. 1, 2, 4

Northbridge

Oakham

Oxford

Palmer

Paxton

Petersham

Phillipston

Princeton

Rutland

Shrewsbury

Southbridge

Spencer

Sterling

Sturbridge

Sutton

Templeton

Townsend

Upton

Uxbridge

Wales

Ware

Warren

Webster

West Boylston

West Brookfield

Westminster

Winchendon

Worcester

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ABOUT PAUL

Paul’s an attorney, Worcester Planning Board member, father of two, and former public school special education teacher who developed and taught in programming for at-risk teens. He’s been recognized for his pro bono legal work.

 

BA, Wesleyan University

JD, Northeastern University

MEd, Fitchburg State University 

 

In 2018, Paul received 48% (146,422 votes) against a four-term incumbent, and is currently a candidate for the now-vacant Council seat in the November 2020 election.

CATCH KIDS BEFORE THEY LAND IN CYCLES OF INCARCERATION

I’ve seen children come out of the system worse off than when they entered. Judges should understand how trauma impacts school, behavior, and child development. Our kids should face lives of opportunity, not incarceration.

ADDRESSING OUR MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS

Addiction is ravaging our communities. We need judges and parole board members who understand mental health, including addiction and trauma. We need to utilize treatment programs and stop releasing prisoners worse off than when they entered.

GETTING SMART ON CRIME

Reducing recidivism saves money, supports communities, and improves working conditions for our corrections officers and law enforcement.

 GENDER EQUALITY

We need judges who will stand up for women's rights. For their reproductive health. For equal opportunity and equal wages. And for the right to be respected and heard.

CIVIL RIGHTS FOR ALL

As we did in Goodridge, we need judges sensitive to society’s ongoing march towards our Commonwealth's ideals of liberty and justice for all.

HONEST PAY FOR HONEST WORK

Our courts must protect rights for workers to organize and collectively bargain.